CHILDREN POISONED BY HAND SANITIZERS –KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN – By Dr. Calvin Day

CHILDREN POISONED BY HAND SANITIZERS –KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN

By Dr. Calvin Day**

September 16, 2015

 

 

A new report from the Georgia Poison Center (georgiapoisoncenter.com) shows that 16,117 children were poisoned by hand sanitizers in 2014. The culprit is usually alcohol. Most hand sanitizers contain approximately twice the alcohol content of hard liquor (i.e. 40% for most hard liquors vs an average of 80% for hand sanitizers). One shot of hard liquor is approximately 1 ½ ounces = 45ml = 3 tablespoons. So if a child swallows 1 ½ tablespoons of hand sanitizer that is equivalent to one shot of hard liquor. And since alcohol tolerance is dependent on body weight, a child under 12 is soon drunk and at risk for worse sequelae. Apparently the scented, flavored, and artificially colored hand sanitizers pose a higher risk because the appearance and smell is attractive to a child. The bottom line is that hand sanitizers should be kept out of reach of children.

 

 

**DR. CALVIN DAY — PROFESSIONAL BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY

  • Calvin Day is a self-employed medical writer and non-clinical consultant on dermatology, general medical, and general health issues.
  • Day graduated summa cum laude from Texas A&M University (College Station), and
  • Was the Salutatorian (second academically ranked student) of his 1976 medical school graduating class at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas.
  • Following graduation from medical school, Dr. Day trained for an additional six years in the Harvard Medical School programs at Massachusetts General Hospital
    • in Internal Medicine,
    • Dermatology, and
  • Day completed his last and seventh year of formal post medical school training as a Mohs Surgery Fellow under the tutelage of Dr. Perry Robins who officed at New York University Medical Center.
  • Day was the principal author of more than 60 professional articles published in refereed medical journals, including two publications in the New England Journal of Medicine. The majority of these articles dealt with skin cancer with a focus on malignant melanoma.
  • Following his formal medical training, Dr. Day, for 28 years had a private practice in San Antonio wherein he routinely logged more than 90 hours per week while building a thriving practice consisting of approximately 40,000 patients who, by in large, had skin cancer and cosmetic dermatology concerns.
  • During this same 28 year period, Dr. Day devoted a portion of his time to teaching skin surgery to dermatology residents at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA), where he held an appointment as “Clinical Professor of Medicine (Dermatology)”.
  • In 2010, Dr. Day was honored by having a UTHSCSA dermatology professorship named after him after he declined a personal gift of $100,000 and diverted it instead to the Dermatology Program at UTHSCSA.
  • From March 2009 through April 2011, Dr. Day made 126 donations to 97 different charitable organizations through charity golf tournaments.
  • For seven consecutive years, from 2004 through 2010 Dr. Day was selected by Texas Monthly as one of Texas’ “Superdoctors”, and
  • In 2010, he was also designated by Newsweek magazine as one of the “Best Doctors in Texas”.